Understanding The Costs Of Diabetes Treatment And Planning For The Future

Original post can be found at:
https://www.thesimpledollar.com/understanding-the-costs-of-diabetes-treatment-and-planning-for-the-future/


by DeVonne Goode
Updated on 06.05.18

Diabetes is a prevalent disease. However, it can still take many by surprise, and leave them struggling to pay medical bills.
With the complexities of the condition and the wide range of costs involved with treatment, having a financing plan is necessary. Health insurance is obviously one of the primary methods of assistance. But not everyone has the adequate coverage to cover
the costs – let alone the out-of-pocket cash to put on the counter every time out.

Opening a savings account, particularly one with high interest, could be a worthwhile investment toward consistently managing the disease today and into the future.

Diabetes at a glance
Type 1 Diabetes

A condition that keeps the body from producing enough insulin. Insulin shots are used to control blood glucose levels. Most diagnosis occur among children and young adults, which is why it is also referred to as juvenile diabetes.

Type 2 Diabetes

The most common form of the condition where the body doesn’t properly use insulin to convert sugar, starches and other food into energy.

Gestational Diabetes

Occurs when women experience high blood glucose levels during pregnancy. It’s usually easily managed and goes away after pregnancy.
Prediabetes

When blood glucose levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be diagnosed as Type 2 diabetes. A large number of Americans are living with prediabetes (1 out of 3 adults). But taking early action to manage glucose levels can prevent diabetes from forming.

People who have diabetes are at higher risk of developing the following health conditions:
Blindness
Heart disease
Stroke
Kidney failure
Blindness
Loss of lower appendages (toes, feet, or legs)

Keep in mind – these conditions occur in the case of severe complications with the disease. With consistent attention to diet and other medical treatments (like most living with type 1 or type 2 diabetes undergo), these conditions are avoidable.
Diabetes by the numbers

According to a recent report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than 100 million U.S. adults are now living with diabetes or prediabetes. Of that, only 12% were aware that they had it. And with approximately 1.5 million new cases being diagnosed every year, the need for education and financial support is clear.

Prevalence
Infogram

Rates of diagnosis for the following ethnic groups
7.4% of non-Hispanic whites
8.0% of Asian Americans
12.1% of Hispanics
12.7% of non-Hispanic blacks
15.1% of American Indians/Alaskan Natives
Breakdown among Asian Americans:
4.3% diagnosed were Chinese
8.9% diagnosed were Filipinos
11.2% diagnosed were Asian Indians
8.5% diagnosed were identified as other Asian Americans
Breakdown among Hispanic adults:
8.5% diagnosed were Central and South Americans
9.0% diagnosed were Cubans
13.8% diagnosed were Mexican Americans
12.0% diagnosed were Puerto Ricans

Underreported deaths due to diabetes

Diabetes is one of the leading causes of death in the United States (seventh as of 2015). However, studies have found that it is also among the most underreported. According to the American Diabetes Association®, only 35% of people who died with diabetes had the disease listed on their death certificate. And of that number, only 10% had diabetes identified as the cause of death.

Underreported Deaths
Infogram

There are a number of possible reasons for the underreported rate. But a lot points to the lack of ability to pay for adequate diagnosis and proper medical treatment.

What specific costs will someone with diabetes have to address?

If you or your child are diagnosed with diabetes, or you’re told that you have prediabetes, management and prevention take center stage. While a lot involves diet and exercise, medication will inevitably have an effect on your finances as well.

According to the American Diabetes Association® (ADA), medical costs for a person with diabetes averages out to $16,750 per year (a total of $327 billion nationwide in 2017). Of that amount, $9,601 is attributed to treatment specifically for diabetes. That’s more than twice the medical cost for people without diabetes.

Of the $327 billion nationally, $237 billion was attributed to direct diabetes medical costs and $90 billion was attributed to indirect costs – absenteeism and reduced productivity at work. Understanding the different forms of diabetes treatment, as well as the direct and indirect costs, is important for wrapping your head around plans for financing.


Type
Treatments

Type 1 Diabetes
Diet
Exercise
Insulin therapy
Regular blood glucose tests/monitoring

Type 2 Diabetes
Diet
Exercise
Insulin therapy
Other medication
Gestational Diabetes
Diet
Exercise
Monitoring sugar intake
Monitoring the baby
Direct Medical Costs ($9,601/year)
Indirect Medical Costs ($90 billion nationally)
Prescription medication (30% of total cost)
Loss of productivity due to mortality ($20 billion nationally)
Hospital care (30% of total cost)
Inability to work as a result of diabetes ($40 billion nationally)
Routine doctor’s office visits (15% of total cost)
Reduced productivity while at work ($30 billion)
Other medications and supplies (25% of total cost)
Reduced productivity due to increased absences and loss of employment from diabetes ($6 billion)

Insulin

Insulin injections are one of the primary forms of medical treatment used to manage diabetes. Especially for those living with type 1 diabetes, who can’t produce insulin of their own, these types of injections are vital for survival. However, the cost for insulin has skyrocketed in recent years, leaving many in the position of having to choose between going into debt or cutting back on medication.

Average cost for insulin as of 2015: $100-$200 per month
Average cost for insulin as of 2018: $400-$500 per month

WIDELY USED INSULIN BRANDS AND INSULIN INJECTION TOOLS
Insulin
Apidra, Humulin, Lantuo, Lente, Levemin, Novolog, Novolin, NPH Insulin, Regular Iletin, Regular Insulin, Velosulin
Insulin Syringes
BD Ultrafine, Levemir®, Monoject, NovoFine®, Ulticare, UniFine, UltiGaurd
Insulin Pumps
Animas, Deltec, Medtronic

Diabetes screenings and other medications

Along with your normal doctor’s visits, diabetes screenings are an important part of the process for identifying the disease. Specifically, if you have been diagnosed, testing your blood glucose levels will become a regular part of your life. Much of the costs for medications involved should be covered by your health insurance. And there are a number of home testing devices you can invest in to help make things more convenient and cost-effective.


WIDELY USED DIABETES TESTING BRANDS AND OTHER MEDICATIONS

Blood Glucose Test Meters and Test Strips
Abbott Freestyle®, Abbott Flash, Accu-Chek Compact®, Ascensia Elite, Ascencia Breeze, Ascensia Contour, Lifescan One-Touch©, Prestige
Injectable Medications
Byetta (Exenatide) injection and Symlin (Pramlintide Acetate) injection, Victoza (lLiraglutide- rDNA origin) injection
Oral Medications
Acarbose, Avandia, Chlorpropamide, Diabinese, Glipizide, Glucophage, Glucotrol, Gylset, Meglitol, Metformin, Prandin, Precose, Repaglinide, Rosiglitazone (These drugs act in different ways to lower blood glucose levels and may be prescribed in combination with other medication.)


Diabetes health expenditures according to group

Depending on whether you or your child has type 1 or type 2 diabetes, total expenditures can vary. Those who manage their condition at home, through diet, exercise, and home testing will have different averages than those needing regular appointments with specialists. According to the American Diabetes Association®, average total healthcare expenditures for diabetes treatment differ according to gender, race, and states with the highest populations of people diagnosed.

Gender
Men: $10,060
Women: $9,110

Race
Hispanics: $8,050
Non-hispanic Blacks: $10,470
Non-hispanic Whites: $9,800
States with highest population of people with diabetes
New York: $21 billion in healthcare expenditures
Florida: $24 billion in healthcare expenditures
Texas $25 billion in healthcare expenditures
California: $39 billion in healthcare expenditures

Options for diabetes treatment financing

In a recent online survey of 500 adults with diabetes, more than half of the participants acknowledged the medical costs involved has had a negative impact on their finances. Many also admitted to going to “extreme lengths” to cover the costs. These lengths include accruing credit card debt, borrowing money from family or friends, and tapping into a savings or retirement account. Many may feel the need to take some extra financial risks because they don’t feel as supported as they’d like. Understanding your options will help you make the most informed choices.

Insurance

Government insurance, such as Medicare and Medicaid provides most of the financial assistance for diabetes care. The military also takes care of a good amount of costs for veterans. The remainder of the cost is covered by private insurance or out-of-pocket cash. According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, 46 states mandate that diabetes be covered under state insurance.

Diabetes Health Insurance Coverage
Infogram

These states require coverage for diabetes treatment as well as equipment and supplies for home use (insulin, pumps, syringes, test meters). Four states do not have that same insurance mandate, however – Ohio, Alabama, North Dakota, and Idaho. Anyone with diabetes who live in any of those four states will most likely need to deal with a private insurer or explore other methods of financing.

Coverage from private insurers usually come through employer-sponsored group plans or individual health plans. Advisors would suggest going with employer-sponsored plans, because they offer higher protections due to being subsidized. On the other hand, if you are unemployed and venturing into the individual market, it may be difficult to find affordable coverage. The reason is that diabetes is considered a “high risk” disease. Insurance companies anticipate a high amount of claims, especially from those with pre-existing conditions. So it will be reflected in the pricing.

HSA

People who have diabetes but don’t have coverage that’s comprehensible enough for their needs may utilize a health savings account (HSA). An HSA is primarily useful for people with high deductibles (at least $1,350 individually, or $2,700 for family). Also, those who are a part of low-income families or don’t live in a “mandate state” may see this as a helpful tool. One big benefit of an HSA is that you take the money with you. There’s no “use it or lose it” policy like some other savings plans. Being able to set aside pre-taxed dollars to help pay for medical expenses can go along way when trying to manage diabetes.

FSA

Another way to set aside dollars for medical expenses is through a flexible spending account (FSA). An FSA is provided through your employer with a $2,650 limit. You can also use it to cover medical expenses for your spouse and dependents. One thing to keep in mind with FSA’s is that they do have an expiration period. You’re generally required to use the funds within your plan year. But your employer may offer extensions at their choosing. The benefit is, it can be used with any type of health plan. And diabetic supplies are eligible to be paid through FSA’s.

High interest savings account

If you’re not interested in dealing with your employer for coverage or a flexible spending account, a high interest savings account could be a good option to explore. It’s just like any other savings account, only with fewer restrictions. Not only are you saving for your medical needs, but your money is also making money. High interest savings accounts are opened through online banks – which means they don’t have to worry about maintaining branches all over the country. They can offer you higher interest rates, with the benefit of accessing your money whenever you want.

Unlike an HSA, a high interest savings account isn’t tied to a high deductible health plan with a dollar limit. And unlike an FSA, there’s no expiration date on when you can use your money. It removes any additional stress so you can concentrate on managing your condition properly. And as you earn interest, you can still take advantage of a number of outreach resources available for people with diabetes.

This condition can be a tough one to get a handle on, but it’s not insurmountable. Let your understanding of diabetes, your knowledge of its treatments, and your strategy for tackling costs work in your favor.

What Are You Waiting For?

While working at a recent bodybuilding event, I had a very interesting conversation with one of the attendees. He was a 42 year old man who revealed to me that he had a couple of health concerns, and who very clearly stated that he wanted to be healthy for his sons (one son was about 10, and the other was about 13). He had a habit of eating fast food daily, and he never exercised because he figured that he was at a normal weight and didn’t need to work out.

He told me that he was so busy with work and with taking the boys to all their practice sessions that there was no time right now to train or to clean up his eating habits. He went on to say that he figured he would wait until the boys were older before he got into an exercise program and cleaned up his diet.

I very nicely told him to make every effort to fit in 10 or 15 minutes of intense plyometric or calisthenics work each day, between work and carting the boys around for their soccer and baseball practice sessions, but deep inside I was incredibly frustrated. I even told him that if he indeed waited a few years until the boys were older, major disease processes like diabetes or high blood pressure could emerge and put him in a dangerous health situation. However, I could tell that my words fell on deaf ears, and that this man would not take any steps towards a healthier lifestyle.

I honestly and truly believe that when it comes to anything in life, where there’s a will, there’s a way. If someone truly wants to positively impact his or her health, then steps can be taken immediately to develop a consistent regimen. There have been plenty of people who have made excuses and lived in denial, who were suddenly stricken by stroke or heart attack. Once a major event like that occurs, assuming someone survives it, there’s a big wake-up call and the person is forced to make the changes he or she didn’t want to make years ago.

Why wait?

Are Diet Sodas Really That Bad?

no-diet-soda

Diet soda is often consumed by people who either want to lose weight, or maintain a normal weight. The ironic thing is that diet sodas actually increase a person’s chances of becoming overweight, by tricking the body into thinking it’s actually consuming sugar, which increases food cravings. A study conducted at the University of Texas discovered that consumption of two or more cans of diet soda daily caused increased waistline girth in subjects studied.

The main reason why diet sodas have damaging effects on the body is because they contain artificial sweeteners. The vast majority of diet sodas on the market contain either aspartame or sucralose. Aspartame has been linked to cognitive decline, mood swings, depression, dizziness and migraines, while sucralose has a negative impact on insulin sensitivity and gut health.

Even just drinking one can of diet soda each day can increase the risk of metabolic syndrome (diabetes, heart disease, and risk for stroke) by close to 40 percent. Diet soda also impairs kidney function. A Harvard study followed 3,000 female subjects who drank diet sodas, and found that those who drank more than two sodas each day had impaired kidney function.

As if that wasn’t enough, diet sodas cause damage at the cellular level, as well as erode tooth enamel. This is due to the very acidic nature of diet soda, which has a pH of 3.2. Chemicals such as sodium benzoate and potassium benzoate are added to inhibit the acidic quality of the soft drink, but these chemicals cause damage in mitochondrial DNA in our cells, and have been linked to numerous allergies and asthma in some subjects.

Lastly, most cans which house diet sodas are coated with bisphenol-A (BPA), which has a strong correlation with development of heart disease and reproductive issues.

If you absolutely can’t give up diet sodas entirely, wean yourself off of them gradually. After you have kicked the daily diet soda habit, you can incorporate a diet soda called Zevia, which does not contain aspartame or sucralose, into your diet.

Skipping Meals Does NOT Work For Weight Loss

skipping-meals

Yes, you read that title correctly. If you have been on one diet after another in an effort to try to lose those last 5, 10, 15, or however many pounds, perhaps losing some weight only to gain all of it back plus some bonus weight, then it is highly likely that you have damaged your metabolism via severe calorie restriction. There is a very good reason why the weight loss industry is so successful and why certain well-known weight loss programs keep their customers coming back. The reason has everything to do with severe caloric restriction which squashes metabolism.

Another common practice among those trying to lose weight is to skip meals in an effort to cut calories. As stated before, you wreak havoc on your metabolism when you skip meals by causing it to slow down. Why does this happen? When there is no food to break down, the body’s furnace slows down and becomes so sluggish that when you actually do eat something, your body is less equipped to break down the food quickly, so much of it is stored as fat. Depriving yourself of food also causes sharp drops in blood sugar, robbing you of energy and increasing insulin resistance. Increased insulin resistance over time can precipitate the development of diabetes.

Other consequences of skipping meals include the following:

• Malnutrition – If you do not feed your body regular, balanced meals, it is highly likely that you are depriving it of essential nutrients. Malnourished states can lead to weight gain, poor health and progression of disease over time.

• Poor concentration – This is due to the depletion of glycogen stores which occurs. The brain simply does not have enough fuel to run on, resulting in fogginess.

• Hunger pangs – When you skip meals, you may experience intense feelings of hunger along with anxiety, dizziness or nausea. In addition, such feeling may lead to overeating when you finally sit down to eat something. Loading the body with a large meal is overkill, and leads to poor digestion and absorption as well as increased storage in body fat stores.

Do yourself a favor and practice the following guidelines. If you do, you will be rewarded with a healthy weight for a lifetime.

1. Don’t skip meals.
2. Make sure to eat enough protein to sustain your energy levels and satisfy your hunger.
3. EAT BREAKFAST.
4. Commit to healthy meals.
5. When you turn to snacks, make sure healthy alternatives are available so you aren’t tempted to reach for a nutrient-poor convenience food.

What Happens When You Skip Meals

skipping-meals1-e1349463891760-300x274

You might be under the impression that skipping meals benefits you since you aren’t taking in calories constantly. Well, I’ve got news for you. By skipping meals, you are putting the brakes on your metabolism. Think of it this way. When a fire is burning in a fireplace, the intensity of the fire dies down dramatically when there are only embers and no logs on the pile. Skipping meals has the same effect. What makes it even worse is that, since the metabolism is now extremely sluggish, when you finally DO eat something, your body can’t break down the food as efficiently, and more of it ends up being stored as fat.

If you skip meals, you probably suffer to some extent from malnutrition, since you aren’t consuming sufficient nutrients throughout the course of the day. Chronic malnutrition can trigger the development and progression of a multitude of diseases. The sharp drops in blood sugar which occur as a result of skipped meals cause an increase in insulin resistance, which can result in the development of diabetes.

When you consider how much of a negative health impact skipping meals has, why would you ever do it?

The Many Benefits Of Cinnamon

Originally published on mensphysique.com on Tuesday, 05 March 2013

http://www.rxmuscle.com/blogs/the-kitchen-eating-strategies/7644-the-many-benefits-of-cinnamon.html
images
Most of you have added cinnamon to your meal plans and know what a flavor boost it can provide to an often dull and monotonous regimen. Some of you also recognize the health benefits which cinnamon provides. This article is directed at individuals who are not aware of the powerful health benefits of this spice.

Ever since I discovered the health benefits of cinnamon a few years ago I have made sure to incorporate a half-teaspoon of this fragrant spice in my first meal of the day. Cinnamon spice is obtained from the bark of the cinnamon tree and can be purchased either in its whole quill form (cinnamon sticks) or as ground powder. I find it more convenient to use the powdered form, but a cinnamon stick in a mug of hot tea is fantastic on a cold winter day.

Cinnamon got a lot of attention a few years back in a 2003 study involving patients with diabetes. Subjects who were given 1, 3 or 6 grams of cinnamon per day demonstrated a measurable reduction in blood sugar, triglycerides, blood pressure, body fat mass, waist circumference, LDL cholesterol and total cholesterol. Studies conducted since that time have determined that cinnamon helps to stabilize blood sugar levels by decreasing insulin response in non-diabetics as well.

As if the blood sugar stabilizing effects weren’t enough, cinnamon has the following health benefits:

· ANTI-FUNGAL AND ANTI-CANDIDA: Especially effective in individuals who are prone to yeast overgrowth.

· ANTI-CLOTTING EFFECT

· ANTIOXIDANT PROPERTIES

· RELIEVES PAIN FROM ARTHRITIS

· INHIBITS BACTERIAL GROWTH AND FOOD SPOILAGE

· FIGHTS ULCER CAUSING H. PYLORI

· FIGHTS E. COLI BACTERIA IN UNPASTEURIZED JUICES

· INHIBITS GROWTH OF LEUKEMIA AND LYMPHOMA CANCER CELLS

· NATURAL MIGRAINE REMEDY

· EXCELLENT SOURCE OF MANGANESE (almost 50% of RDA)

· GOOD SOURCE OF CALCIUM AND DIETARY FIBER

Cinnamon is a versatile spice which can be added to savory dishes while also enhancing sweeter dishes. It can also serve to curb cravings for sugary food items because of its satisfying flavor. Cinnamon is especially tasty in tea, oatmeal, cream of wheat, protein pancakes. If you haven’t added this amazing spice to your daily meal regimen, I highly recommend you do so today!

High Fructose Corn Syrup

Originally published on mensphysique.com on Monday, 01 October 2012

http://www.rxmuscle.com/blogs/the-lab-supplement-school/6661-high-fructose-corn-syrup.html
Corn Syrup
Corn sugar, or high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) as it is more commonly called, is the most common sweetener which is used in processed foods and beverages. In fact, HFCS comprises more than 40 percent of caloric sweeteners added to foods and beverages and is the sole caloric sweetener in soft drinks in the United States. It is adored by the food industry because it is extremely sweet, incredibly cheap, easy to transport and keeps foods moist. Like its chemical cousin table sugar (sucrose), it has raised eyebrows in the research world and prompted a growing body of studies which examine the manner in which the body processes it. The general consensus is that consumption of large quantities of any type of sugar is closely linked to dental cavities, obesity, malnutrition, and increased triglycerides. One study which was published in Metabolism Journal discovered that individuals who drank a beverage sweetened with HFCS had fructose blood levels five grams higher than those consuming a beverage sweetened with table sugar. This may not seem like much, but when you consider the cumulative effects, HFCS becomes a much more insidious dietary villain.

Fructose and GlucoseLet’s examine the composition of HFCS. This substance contains from 43 to 55 percent fructose with the remainder as glucose. In contrast, sucrose is 50 percent fructose and 50 percent glucose. Both are quite similar except when it comes to chemical bonds. When HFCS is made from cornstarch, the fructose molecules are not bound to other sugar molecules, while with sucrose, every fructose molecule is bound to a glucose molecule. When sucrose is ingested, it must undergo an extra metabolic step before the body can use it. With HFCS, the body reacts to the fructose readily. The problem is that fructose has no effect on glucose levels and insulin release (in other words, it skips glycolysis) and thus will not trigger the release of leptin (the hormone which signals your body to stop eating when it is full) nor create a feeling of satiety. This can lead to a higher caloric intake with a corresponding body weight increase. Basically, HFCS tricks the body into thinking it’s hungry when it may already be full.

Foods Containing Large Levels of HFCS
· Regular soft drinks
· Salad dressings
· Breakfast cereals
· Frozen yogurts
· Canned soups
· Canned fruits (if not in their own juice)
· Jarred and canned pasta sauces
· Bread
· Fruit-flavored yogurts
· Pancake syrups fruit juice and fruit drinks
· Popsicles
· Ketchup and barbecue sauces

Make sure to check ingredient listings, especially with the foods listed above, and try to avoid HFCS whenever possible.

Incrediwear Is Incredible!

downloadI have spent the last few days experiencing Incrediwear products, and I am blown away by them! The quality is exceptional and the technology is phenomenal. I give this company and its products my complete and enthusiastic endorsement, both as an athlete and as a physician.

Here is a great description of the technology, taken from the Incrediwear website:

Incrediwear Technology

What are anions?
Anions are negatively charged atoms that, when absorbed by the body, stimulates molecular vibration and circulation.

How does our product work?
When the body warms our unique carbonized charcoal and our carbonized charcoal/germanium products, they release anions.

What does this do for me?
Incredibraces and Incredisocks, due to the release of anions, are constantly therapeutic. Infrared anion technology has been used for years at medical clinics to address vascular and circulatory health, and professional athletes have slept in ionized environments since the 70s. The technology has been used by chiropractors and physical therapists to accelerate recovery—and it’s all thanks to anions.

How fast does it work?
Results have shown that most people who experience muscle or joint discomfort and try an Incredibrace feel a difference in 20 minutes, and sometimes sooner! Incredibraces have helped those with discomfort from sprains, arthritis, inflammation, cramps, and fatigue. Incredibrace wearers have reported a reduction in discomfort and an enhanced range of motion while walking, working, running, biking, dancing, competing in martial arts, lifting weights and even sleeping.

Do the socks work the same way?
Yes. The socks are also made from carbonized charcoal, and some have a mix of germanium in them. As your body heats the sock, it releases the therapeutic anions, resulting in increased circulation. Each garment is laser Doppler studied showing up to 17% increase in blood flow and blood speed. Increase blood flow can result in accelerated performance and recovery!

Is there anything else I should know?
The enhanced circulation results in more oxygen being supplied to local tissues. This, combined with the increase in blood flow, allows your body to regulate your temperature much easier, keeping you cool in warm weather and warm in cool weather, and even warm when the socks get wet! The natural fibers are antimicrobial and odor absorbing.

What does Germanium do?
Organic germanium is the subject of Dr. Asai’s book ‘Miracle Cure – Organic Germanium’—and for good reason. Germanium helps supply oxygen. Dr. Asai mentions that cells which are deficient in oxygen, in order to survive, begin glycolysis and turn anaerobic, meaning they no longer efficiently use oxygen. There are many factors which can lead to a reduced amount of oxygen in the blood including air pollution, food pollution, and the effects of stress. Dr. Asai states that germanium fuels a mechanism called the dehydrogenating reaction, which combines oxygen with hydrogen and supports cellular defenses

Benefits:
Increased blood flow and oxygen
Wick away moisture
Regulate temperature
Reduce swelling
Anti-microbial
Reduce pain
Supports improved range of motion
Accelerate muscle recovery with increase blood flow

Physical Properties:
High comfort 200 thread count (socks) 360 thread count (braces)
One-of-a-kind medical design
Patented technology
Quality 3D weave design
Anion emitting thread (braces)
Carbonized charcoal germanium thread (braces)

PLEASE MAKE SURE TO VISIT THE INCREDIWEAR WEBSITE:
http://www.buyincrediwear.com/

Two Magic Ingredients To Prevent Diabetes

diabetesDiabetes mellitus is a devastating disease which affects every organ system in the body and which affects over 300 million people worldwide, with over 4 million deaths resulting from diabetes-related complications each year. With such staggering statistics, it makes perfect sense to change one’s eating habits so that lower glycemic index foods are favored over high index foods. In addition, one can look into insulin mimetics. Insulin mimetics are substances which mimic the action of insulin, thus supporting it and guarding against the development of insulin resistance which precedes progression into diabetes.

CinnamonOne insulin mimetic is methyl hydroxychalcone polymer (MHCP) which is found in cinnamon. Unless you have severe heartburn, you can and should eat cinnamon daily. I always recommend sprinkling cinnamon on oatmeal or cream of wheat, but you can also take cinnamon in capsule form. Another insulin mimetic is lipoic acid, which increases the expression of glucose receptors on muscle cells. For individuals who are susceptible to insulin resistance, I highly recommend incorporating both of these substances in to their daily regimen. Start with 300 milligrams of alpha lipoic acid and sprinkle cinnamon onto your morning oatmeal.
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