Do you have food intolerance?

Image ID : 29041123 Copyright : guniita

What is food intolerance?

Have you ever noticed that when you eat a certain food, such as tuna, blueberries, avocado, asparagus or broccoli, that you get extremely bloated to the point that you are extremely uncomfortable? Since the foods I mentioned are celebrated for their many nutritional benefits, it might not occur to you that you most likely have an intolerance to that food. Up to 80% of the U.S. population has some form of food intolerance.

Most people are aware of food allergies, but food intolerance is a different phenomenon which can have a tremendous effect on a person’s quality of life. Food allergies appear quite suddenly, from seconds to minutes after ingestion of the offending food, and can be life-threatening, whereas food intolerance is a more gradual process (taking hours to a couple of days for symptoms to emerge), not life-threatening, and may only occur after a large amount of the food is eaten. Food allergies and food intolerance can both cause similar symptoms, such as abdominal pain, nausea, and diarrhea, but food intolerance is notorious for causing bloating, heartburn, irritability, headaches and general malaise. The most common food allergy triggers are peanuts, tree nuts, shellfish, fish, soy, wheat, milk and eggs, while the foods most commonly associated with food intolerance are dairy products, gluten-containing grains, eggs, citrus, beans, cabbage, and broccoli.

People who are allergic to certain foods know that even a small amount of the food can trigger an allergic response, and the response occurs every single time the person is exposed. The immune system reacts to the food by causing a release of IgE antibodies, which then cause a release of histamines and cytokines designed to attack the offending agent. Sometimes the entire body is affected by this response, and symptoms such as shortness of breath, hives, rash, or a sudden drop in blood pressure can occur. Food intolerance, in contrast, is more insidious, and may only occur if a large amount of the triggering food is eaten or if it is consumed frequently. Trigger foods will cause a rise in IgA, IgG, and IgM antibodies, causing the body to mount a delayed reaction which is characterized by mostly gastrointestinal symptoms, but which can cause other symptoms as well. Regardless of how the body reacts, the discomfort caused by poor digestion of the food can be enough to make the sufferer miserable.

Why does food intolerance occur? There are several explanations. One cause is enzyme deficiency. All enzymes are specific to one type of molecule, such as lipases which break down fats. Sometimes an individual can be deficient or completely lacking in a very specific enzyme which is required for digestion of a particular food. A common example is found in lactose intolerant individuals who do not have enough lactase to break down the milk sugars into their constituent parts for absorption in the intestine. The lactose cannot be broken down so it sits in the intestine, causing bloating, spasm and diarrhea when it sits in the digestive tract. Approximately 25% of the U.S. population suffers from lactose intolerance, which amounts to a lot of bloated bellies from the consumption of dairy products.

Another common type of food intolerance is to gluten. Gluten is highly resistant to digestion as it is, and in some individuals, the gluten cannot be broken down at all. The problem with gluten is that it is found in wheat, rye, barley, spelt and kamut, so avoiding gluten can be challenging to say the least. Approximately 1% of the U.S. population has celiac disease, while about 15% have gluten intolerance. Regardless of whether someone has celiac disease or gluten intolerance, ALL gluten must be avoided. However, if there are occasions in which completely avoiding gluten is impossible, digestive enzymes, specifically DPP-IV, can help individuals to digest meals containing gluten.

The list of substances which people may have an intolerance to doesn’t stop there. Some individuals cannot break down phenols, including salicylates, due to insufficient amounts of xylanase, and suffer from behavioral and learning disorders, including ADHD and autism. Some individuals are unable to break down disaccharides, an intolerance which is closely linked to irritable bowel disease, ulcerative colitis, Candida overgrowth and autism. As if all that wasn’t enough to worry about, there are chemical substances in foods which can spark intolerance, such as caffeine, aflatoxins in undercooked beans, amines in cheeses, artificial colorings and flavorings, preservatives, sweeteners, emulsifiers, nitrates, MSG, sulfites and salicylates. Salicylate intolerance can cause a susceptible individual to react to large amounts of salicylate-containing foods, particularly citrus fruits, teas, mint flavoring, berries and processed foods with flavor additives.

The digestive tract regularly takes the brunt of foods, medications, hormones, and chemical additives which can interfere with repair of the gut lining, causing increased intestinal permeability which is more commonly known as leaky gut. Leaky gut is characterized by the loosening of tight junctions between the cells which line the gut, thus allowing food molecules to pass through. These free floating food molecules are viewed by the immune system as a threat and will mount an immune response which manifests as the signs and symptoms of food intolerance. Think of all that food sitting in the gut, undigested. Pretty unnerving, huh?

How to diagnose food intolerance

Diagnosing food intolerance can be extremely difficult since the signs and symptoms often mimic those of food allergy. One method of ferreting out which foods are involved in a food intolerance is keeping a food diary in which all foods eaten are recorded, along with symptoms and their time of onset. After suspected trigger foods have been determined, an exclusion diet can be implemented, in which those foods are removed from the diet for weeks to months. If the symptoms disappear during the exclusion phase, potential trigger foods can be re-introduced after this phase is completed in order to determine which substances are problematic. If the food intolerance is mild, a small amount of the food will not trigger symptoms, and in many cases may still be consumed, especially if enzymes are taken to aid in digestion. Essentially, many people can return to foods which they were mildly or even moderately intolerant of after avoiding it for a period of time.

Blood testing is considered the most reliable and comprehensive form of testing for food intolerance, but there are only a few laboratories which specialize in this type of test. ALCAT, Pinnertest.com and HEMOCODE Food Intolerance System are laboratories which offer food intolerance testing via serum analysis, with ALCAT considered the largest food intolerance testing group in the U.S. Some insurance plans will cover part or all of the expense of the testing, so it is always worth inquiring about insurance coverage. Some testing panels also provide a detailed rotation diet which patients can follow when they are ready to reintroduce the foods of which they are intolerant.

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Leaky Gut

food-allergy-leaky-gut-inflammation
If you suffer from sudden food sensitivities, aching joints, digestive upset, fatigue or weight gain, you may be suffering from leaky gut, which is also referred to as increased intestinal permeability. Leaky gut is characterized by the opening of pores in the small intestine, resulting in undigested food particles, bacteria, and toxins traveling to the bloodstream. The presence of these substances in the bloodstream triggers an immune response, whereby the body builds antibodies to the foreign substances but also attacks itself, creating food allergies and autoimmune disorders.

You are probably wondering how something like this occurs and if you are at risk. Let’s look at the main causative factors leading to leaky gut syndrome:

1. Chronic constipation – If you are usually constipated, toxins will often build up in stool, irritating the intestinal lining and causing inflammation, which then causes the pores in the small intestine to expand. In severe cases, Crohn’s Disease, irritable bowel syndrome,or colitis can occur.

2. Chronic stress – The immune system really takes a beating when subjected to chronic stress. If the immune response is compromised, pathogenic bacteria can cause widespread inflammation in the intestines, and leaky gut is a common result.

3. Dysbiosis – This is an imbalance between beneficial and harmful bacteria which can result from antibiotics or poor diet. Inflammation develops, causing the pores to widen.

4. Toxins – We are exposed to many thousands of toxins, but the worst offenders are found in our water supply, pesticides, and in certain medications.

leaky-gut
What Is The Solution If You Have A Leaky Gut?

I have several dietary recommendations for treating a leaky gut.

1. Glutamine – I am already a big fan of glutamine in general, but especially for those who suffer from leaky gut. This amino acid has specific activity in the intestine, and restores healthy soft tissue in the region. Over time, regular supplementation with glutamine has a protective effect against intestinal disease. I tend to be fairly aggressive with glutamine and recommend 6 to 8 grams per day, or more if you engage in frequent exercise.

2. Fish oil – Try to find a formula which contains primarily omega-3 fatty acids. You can also increase your consumption of salmon.

3. Digestive enzymes – Digestive enzymes will aid in the breakdown of food substances, especially in older individuals and those suffering from leaky gut. Try taking them with every meal.

4. Betaine hydrochloric acid – Some people produce insufficient amounts of hydrochloric acid, which is needed to break down food in the stomach. If that is the case, betaine hydrochloric acid optimizes the process.

5. probiotics – Most individuals will benefit from adding probiotics into their daily regimen. Make sure to take at least 25 billion units per day for optimal gut health.

Should You Be Afraid Of Water Bottles And Cans?

Originally published on mensphysique.com on Sunday, 15 July 2012
cans_plastic
http://www.rxmuscle.com/blogs/the-lab-supplement-school/6078-should-you-be-afraid-of-water-bottles-and-cans.html

Unless you have been living under a rock you have heard about the concern over human exposure to Bisphenol A, also referred to as BPA. BPA is an organic compound (chemical formula (CH3)2C(C6H4OH)2 ) which is a colorless solid used to confer hardness to polycarbonate plastic. It is also used in epoxy resins to create and antibacterial coating in the lining of metal cans which are used in the food industry. BPA can leech from containers into the foods they hold and become ingested by individuals when those food items are consumed.

What makes BPA a concern for people is the fact that it is a weak endocrine disruptor which mimics estrogen and has substantial negative side effects on health. A U.S. Government sponsored review of the scientific literature on BPA was conducted in 2006, resulting in the following statement:”BPA at concentrations found in the human body is associated with organizational changes in the prostate, breast, testis, mammary glands, body size, brain structure and chemistry, and behavior of laboratory animals.” I don’t know about you, but such a conclusion is terrifying to me and enough to keep me invested in using containers made of stainless steel, glass, and BPA-free plastic for the rest of my life.

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reported that approximately 93% of Americans have detectable levels of BPA in their bodies. Even at low doses, BPA causes diabetes, heart disease, reproductive issues, breast and prostate cancer, low sperm count, altered brain development and obesity. When one considers the long-term exposure to which most of us have been subjected, the implications become staggering and quite disconcerting.

Diseases Linked to BPA Exposure

HEART DISEASE – Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys discovered that men with the highest levels of BPA exposure (measured through urinary samples) were 10% more likely to develop heart disease. It is believed that BPA suppresses a hormone which has a protective effect against heart attacks, oxidative stress, and damage to blood vessels.

DIABETES AND OBESITY – BPA causes an increase in insulin release from the pancreas which causes a reduction in the body’s ability to utilize fat, thus increasing the risk for both diabetes and obesity.

THYROID FUNCTION – BPA has been shown to bind to thyroid hormone receptors, thus disrupting normal thyroid function.

NEUROLOGICAL DAMAGE – Numerous research studies on different animal models have determined that low-dose BPA maternal exposure causes long-term neurobehavioral development in developing fetuses, interfering with brain cell connections vital to memory, attention and mood. Furthermore, BPA potentiates, or boosts, central dopaminergic systems, creating increased sensitivity to drug-abuse induced reward effects.

INTESTINAL DAMAGE – BPA can damage intestinal lining, causing “leaky gut syndrome”. This interferes with the gut’s ability to block toxins and bacteria from entering the body.

INFERTILITY – Chronic exposure to low doses of BPA can impair the growth and function of the egg cells which are involved in ovulation due to the fact that it binds to receptors in the cells which are designed to bind with estrogen.

ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION – A 2009 study conducted on over 200 Chinese workers in BPA factories found that those men were four times more likely to have erectile dysfunction and seven times more likely to have problems with ejaculation.

CANCER – BPA is capable of inducing neoplastic transformation in human breast epithelial cells and has also been found to reduce sensitivity to chemotherapy treatment of specific tumors.

Where BPA Lurks

BPA is far more pervasive than you may ever imagine. Here is a list of items which have been found to contain BPA:

· Water bottles
· Food cans
· Soda cans
· Infant formula
· Wine and Beer (due to fermentation in BPA resin lined vats)
· Recycled paper (including toilet paper)
· CDs
· Baby bottles
· Dental fillings
· Plastic cups
· Hard plastic 5-gallon drinking water bottles
· Credit card receipts at gas stations
· Plastic food storage containers

The Centers for Disease Control have conducted numerous studies which have detected BPA in the urine of over 90% of adults and children tested. Another study which was conducted in 2009 revealed that drinking from plastic water bottles almost doubled urinary BPA levels. Yet another study examined subjects who consumed canned soup during one test period and fresh soup during another test period. After only five days the participants consuming the canned soup had an increase in urinary BPA levels of 1221% compared to those consuming fresh soup.

Guidelines to Minimizing BPA Exposure
Fortunately a large number of food storage containers can now be found which utilize stainless steel, glass and BPA-free plastics. In fact many shaker cups are now being constructed from BPA-free plastic. A handful of bodybuilders who still incorporate canned tuna into their meal plans have the option of purchasing their tuna in foil pouches instead of cans which are lined with BPA.

I realize that the following list is rather comprehensive, so it is up to you to decide how aggressively you would like to minimize BPA exposure.

· Do not drink out of plastic water bottles unless they are BPA-free.
· Replace plastic storage containers with those made of stainless steel, glass, ceramic or paper. If you must use plastic, look for resin identification codes (the number on the underside of containers) 4, 5, 1 or 2. Make sure to avoid containers marked with 7, as these almost invariably contain BPA.
· Avoid purchasing food and beverages which are packaged in cans.
· Wrap sandwiches in paper or cloth.
· Do not drink soda from a can.
· Avoid purchasing recycled toilet paper or paper products.
· Never heat food in plastic or place warm or hot food into plastic containers, bags, or cling wraps.
· Do not put plastic items in dishwasher.
· Avoid contact between acidic or fatty foods and plastic.
· Use metal eating utensils.
· Purchase reusable water bottles and shaker cups which are labeled BPA-free.
· Buy glass appliances whenever possible. (eg: blenders)
· Replace plastic coffee filters with ceramic or metal ones
· If you use a French press for coffee, make sure it is all metal and glass with no plastic parts.
· Wash hands after touching cash register receipts or money.

Leaky Gut

food-allergy-leaky-gut-inflammation
If you suffer from sudden food sensitivities, aching joints, digestive upset, fatigue or weight gain, you may be suffering from leaky gut, which is also referred to as increased intestinal permeability. Leaky gut is characterized by the opening of pores in the small intestine, resulting in undigested food particles, bacteria, and toxins traveling to the bloodstream. The presence of these substances in the bloodstream triggers an immune response, whereby the body builds antibodies to the foreign substances but also attacks itself, creating food allergies and autoimmune disorders.

You are probably wondering how something like this occurs and if you are at risk. Let’s look at the main causative factors leading to leaky gut syndrome:

1. Chronic constipation – If you are usually constipated, toxins will often build up in stool, irritating the intestinal lining and causing inflammation, which then causes the pores in the small intestine to expand. In severe cases, Crohn’s Disease, irritable bowel syndrome,or colitis can occur.

2. Chronic stress – The immune system really takes a beating when subjected to chronic stress. If the immune response is compromised, pathogenic bacteria can cause widespread inflammation in the intestines, and leaky gut is a common result.

3. Dysbiosis – This is an imbalance between beneficial and harmful bacteria which can result from antibiotics or poor diet. Inflammation develops, causing the pores to widen.

4. Toxins – We are exposed to many thousands of toxins, but the worst offenders are found in our water supply, pesticides, and in certain medications.

leaky-gut
What Is The Solution If You Have A Leaky Gut?

I have several dietary recommendations for treating a leaky gut.

1. Glutamine – I am already a big fan of glutamine in general, but especially for those who suffer from leaky gut. This amino acid has specific activity in the intestine, and restores healthy soft tissue in the region. Over time, regular supplementation with glutamine has a protective effect against intestinal disease. I tend to be fairly aggressive with glutamine and recommend 6 to 8 grams per day, or more if you engage in frequent exercise.

2. Fish oil – Try to find a formula which contains primarily omega-3 fatty acids. You can also increase your consumption of salmon.

3. Digestive enzymes – Digestive enzymes will aid in the breakdown of food substances, especially in older individuals and those suffering from leaky gut. Try taking them with every meal.

4. Betaine hydrochloric acid – Some people produce insufficient amounts of hydrochloric acid, which is needed to break down food in the stomach. If that is the case, betaine hydrochloric acid optimizes the process.

5. probiotics – Most individuals will benefit from adding probiotics into their daily regimen. Make sure to take at least 25 billion units per day for optimal gut health.