Knit Knack

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Image ID : 69123108
Copyright : sebboy12

 

There was something about knitting that always appealed to me as a child.  I was enchanted by women who were in the midst of knitting something, and would watch them as they wielded their handiwork on a skein of yarn.   By the time I was eight years old, I was dead set on learning the art of knitting, and since my mother did not know how to knit, I ended up going to the library and borrowing a book on knitting.  I then asked my mom to take me to the local hobby shop, where I purchased three skeins of acrylic yarn: one pale yellow, one ivory, and one navy blue.
I remember studying the illustrations which accompanied the instructions for casting on stitches, knitting, and purling, and I caught on quickly.  And since I was reading a book with right-handed instructions, I learned to knit right-handed even though I am left-hand dominant with crocheting, writing, drawing, painting and eating.  To this day, I knit right-handed.
When I was in my teens and 20’s, I knitted scarves, afghans and a sweater which I proudly wore until the oppressively hot 100% acrylic yarn made wearing it next to impossible.  I didn’t pick up knitting needles again until February of this year.  For whatever reason, I suddenly missed the meditative, repetitive motion of knitting, and decided to tackle a project.  I purchased yarn and circular knitting needles, downloaded a knitting pattern for a cardigan sweater, and started knitting.
I had my heart set on a long sweater duster, so I extended the lower body pattern to accommodate the longer length.  I used the exact brand and weight of yarn which was used in the pattern, but because the extra length was so heavy, the panel stretched out so much that it looked warped.  My hopes dashed for a long sweater coat, I stared at the panel, trying to figure out how I was going to salvage it.  Was I going to use it as a throw blanket?  No, it was slightly too small for that.  I draped the panel over my shoulders and toyed with the idea of a poncho, when I came up with an idea.  What if I fashioned the corners into sleeves?  I began pinning and measuring, and once I figured out a design, I sewed up the panel, creating sort of a kimono sleeve coat.
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What do you guys think?
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Which Chrissy’s Socks Am I Wearing?

Thigh high boots are part of my signature style…so are thigh high socks!

My friends know that I am obsessed with thigh high boots, but they might not know how much I enjoy wearing different thigh high socks underneath my boots. There is a wild streak in me that gravitates towards fun designs like the ones that Chrissy’s Socks offers, and the best part is that it’s my way of having fun with my personal style. When I’m home, I really enjoy walking around the house in leggings and fun knee high or thigh high socks.

Can you guess which pair of Chrissy’s Socks I might be wearing here?

Which style of Chrissy’s Socks am I wearing here?

Here are the thigh high sock styles which Chrissy’s Socks offers:

https://www.kneehighsocks.org/products/Thigh-High.html#.XLE8gPZFzVI

A great pair of socks will stay in place, feel great against the skin, and with thigh high boots, help to keep the boots in place so that they don’t slouch or bunch up. Chrissy’s Socks deliver on all counts!

Check out all of their amazing styles by accessing this link:
https://www.kneehighsocks.org

A Princess Dream Come True

Our court from 1991. I am second from left on the bottom row. This was taken about a month before our Nisei Week Pageant and Queen selection.

Over two decades ago, my first seemingly dreamy and unattainable goal was to be involved in a yearly Japanese-American festival in Los Angeles known as Nisei Week, which was established back in 1934.  Aside from a period of seven years between 1942 and 1948, during which World War II raged and carried a solid and jarring impact on the Japanese-American community, the Nisei Week festival has continued to run throughout the decades.

As a child, I remember seeing the Nisei Week Queen and court each year, and it became a dream of mine to be selected as a court member when I got older. However, I got sidetracked by life and didn’t bother to enter the  competition for the local queen selection until the year I turned 25.  I was stunned when I was chosen as the Queen of my community center (the San Fernando Valley Japanese American Community Center, or SFVJACC) for that year.

Once I was selected, I spent the next three months in regular meetings with the queens from the other eight participating communities, meetings in which we would practice all the routines for the beauty pageant which would mark the beginning of that year’s Nisei Week. We competed in that pageant for over 1,000 audience members in a 3 hour event, and though I didn’t win the Nisei Week Queen title, I was happy with being a Nisei Week Princess. We rode on floats, visited businesses, and fostered good will throughout the Japanese-American community.

August 16, 2015: Nisei Week Queen and Court on the float of Nisei Week Japanese Festival Parade at Little Tokyo in Downtown Los Angeles.

When we were on stage, on parade floats, and on visitations, we would wear our sashes, a definite marker which identified us all as queen and court.  On some occasions, we would wear our crowns, and were either clad in matching dresses, or in kimono.

Queen?  Princess?  I guess so, at least in pageant terms!

The Bikini Box

It may be considered strange by some people, but I perform scheduled purges of my belongings on a regular basis. Why? Because they enable me to stay organized, and they also force me to get rid of items I don’t need. Recently, I decided that as part of a household purge, I would go through every single bikini in my bikini box.

The bikini box I am referring to is an underbed storage box which holds all of my bikinis. I established this system several years ago when I began to accumulate bikinis and would use them in photo shoots. After struggling to sort through my collection when I packed for a slew of photo shoots over the summer, I realized that there were suits I had never worn, suits which had been shot too many times, suits which no longer fit, and suits which had never fit.

I tried on every single suit, assessed fit, and determined whether to keep it or give it away. If I decided to keep a suit, I then made sure the top was tied securely at the neck, and also secured the side ties on bottoms, to make it easier to put it on when at a shoot. I also cut off tags so that they wouldn’t poke at me or stick out and create extra editing work for photographers. I also labeled the bags I stored the bikinis in so that the styles could be easily identified without me having to remove the suit from the bag.

It took me five hours to go through that bikini box, which means I averaged about 20 suits per hour. I gave away close to 20 suits and kept the rest, making sure that each suit was in a slide lock sandwich size storage bag. The suits are organized by color, making it easier for me to select suits for a shoot.

Now I am ready to shoot!

YogaClub.com Review

One evening at the end of May I watched three Facebook Live streams of women doing unboxings of YogaClub shipments. I was intrigued by how these women sang praises for the mystery boxes. Since I occasionally wear yoga leggings and a sport bra when I attend aerial or yoga class, I figured it was worth taking a chance by enrolling in the YogaClub program. I chose the intermediate $69 Karma level, which offered a hand curated outfit consisting of 2 or 3 items (the site now limits this to two pieces).

Approximately $74 and two weeks later, I got my first box and loved the quality of two of the items, a raspberry Columbia sport bra and a Magick Tarot Hot Pant from Teeki. But the hideous, boxy Luka-Lux top which completed the trio was so unflattering and drab that I had to return it.

This is where the problems began. You see, in order for me to return the Luka-lux top which I hadn’t even selected (apparently the curator has a horrible sense of style), I had to pay return shipping (incidentally, any returned items after the first return are subject to a $12.95 fee, plus shipping to cover the costs of restocking…never mind that you didn’t pick the items!). Well fine. About ten days later, I received an email confirming receipt of the item and informing me that an “Exchange Store Link” would be sent to me.

Skip ahead to the end of June. Still no Exchange Store Link. Oh, and look, I was charged $78 and some change for the June shipment. All right, fine. I got a second box for the next month which consisted of two nice items which I decided to keep. Incidentally, the leggings which they sent me were available for $32 online through other stores, which meant that YogaClub actually charged me MORE than the current retail on the order I received.

I contacted the customer service department regarding the Exchange Store Link THREE TIMES. I became exasperated and contacted them through Facebook. Suddenly, they paid attention, and they immediately emailed the Exchange Store Link. They explained that I was supposed to submit a tracking number for the returned item in order for them to furnish the link. Huh? Then explain the %@&#ing email confirmation of receipt to me!

I accessed the link, and of COURSE there was nothing comparable to the paltry store credit they gave me. So I had to spend another $26 on the item which I ordered in exchange for the ugly top.

As soon as I placed the order for the exchange item, I wrote to YogaClub via Facebook, stating I wanted my membership canceled immediately. Their response was that I was REQUIRED do it via phone call, due to the “sensitive nature” of the request. I HAD called, and had to leave a voicemail message, so I mentioned that. They insisted that it had to be done through the phone. By this time, I was so angry that steam was emanating from the crown of my head. I asked when the call would be returned. I was told that my call would be returned later that day. But of course no call came that day.

The next day YogaClub decided to call me so early in the morning that I was sleeping, and of course missed the call. So I wrote to them via FB and complained about the early morning call, and it was only then that they agreed to cooperate and ask me what time would be an acceptable time to reach me. I received a call later that morning, and was informed that my membership had already been cancelled, so there was no need to do anything via phone. The representative also informed me that a “free” top would be included in my exchange. Listen, a free top isn’t changing my opinion of a company which rips off its members and practices shoddy customer service.

This is NOT A GOOD DEAL. The items are from the clearance bins from the different companies, and can easily be purchased for less. Plus you are at the mercy of curators who may pick something you hate, and for which YOU get penalized.

Read their reviews on Facebook. Many women, myself included, HATE this company. Buyer beware!